First Stitch Syndrome

Have your heard of First Stitch Syndrome?

It’s a dreadful affliction that sometimes affects new knitters!

Symptoms include: fear of being an inferior knitter, disliking what you have knit, sighing and feeling inept, and very often ripping out perfectly good pieces of knitting.

And all because the edge of their knitting looks sloppy

The good news is that there is a VERY SIMPLE CURE!

I am going to share it with you today, and hopefully you can help me spread it and we can end the terrible affliction of First Stitch Syndrome.

The Symptom

The problem is that when you knit flat (not in the round) you have an edge to your knitting, and therefore, an edge stitch.

This edge stitch often ends up being larger than it’s next door neighbor. This results in a whole line of big, sloppy stitches.  Sloppy edge stitches make sewing up a chore because you have big holes and it just looks MESSY.

The really frustrating thing for some new knitters is that they can see the problem – and they have a solution!

At the next edge they knit the first stitch and they pull, and pull and pull so the stitch is SOOOO tight there is no WAY it can end up sloppy, but four or five stitches in they look back and there it is – sloppy again!

But knowing that they DID pull it tight they do it again on the next edge, and on the next and end up frustrated and depressed and exclaiming things like “I just can’t get it right” or ” I will never learn to knit correctly!”  There is often gnashing of teeth  and can sometimes even be wailing!

The Problem

First Stitch Syndrome is a devilishly annoying.  Let’s break the problem down.

You want the first stitch you knit in the row to be the same size as the others, so you pull really tight on that stitch to “tame” it, and FORCE it to be tight.  In effect you are asking the stitch to be SMALLER than it wants to be, smaller in fact that the needle size you are using.

But unfortunately as soon as you go onto the second stitch the first stitch relaxes and before you know it you have a stitch that is slouching in the corner like a angst filled teenager.

It doesn’t matter how hard you pull on that yarn as you make the stitch, it always relaxes as you move on.

This doesn’t happen very often with other stitches, it’s only edge one that causes so much trouble.

The problem is that the edge stitches are only supported on ONE SIDE.  All the other stitches in your row have stitches on BOTH sides, so they are supported and sustained and keep their shape.

But it’s the very nature of an edge stitch to be ON THE EDGE. So what’s a poor knitter to do?

The Solution

There is a cure to First Stitch Syndrome. Think about these things first.

Think RELAX

Pulling, yanking, forcing or otherwise getting violent with your yarn will do nothing to solve the problem and much to raise your blood pressure. So the first step to a cure is to relax. Let go of your frustration, it is only adding to the problem.

Think TAUT

When you knit the size of your stitches is determined by your needle. Not by you, not by your muscle strength, but by the needle.  Every stitch should be the same size because the NEEDLE makes that decision.  A good knitter develops a habit of not knitting too loosely or too tightly, but so that each stitch fits snug and taut (not sloppy or tight) around the needle.

Hopefully you have already developed this habit with the “inner” stitches, so now let’s make sure your edge stitches work the same way.

Think ALIGNMENT

This is important: Your edge stitches are not alone. They DO have stitches on either side of them.  They have the second stitch, obviously. But they also have the last stitch of the last row. It’s sitting below the edge stitch, you just finished it! And you know what? You thought you were done with it and have cavalierly just abandoned it to it’s fate and moved onto the next row. Big mistake.

You need to have both the last stitch of the last row, and the first stitch of this row in alignment. Then they are both supported on both sides, and they won’t go all loosey-goosey on you.

  1. Knit the fist stitch in the row as usual – do not go crazy trying to pull it tight, let the needle with do the work. Relax.
  2. Put your needle into the next stitch (the second stitch in the row), wind your yarn around the needle AS IF to make the stitch, but pause.
  3. Pull the yarn TAUT (don’t make the stitch yet), not tight.
  4. Watch your yarn as you slowly pull it taut, make sure that it is pulling from the LAST stitch of the last row, THROUGH the first stitch so that they are BOTH the right size.
  5. Let that size be determined by your needle, not by your frustration.
  6. When the previous two stitches are in ALIGNMENT, complete the second stitch.

Now go on about your business, worry free.

The second stitch will hold the tautness of the first stitch (which is holding the tautness of the last stitch) and you can move on with confidence.

Ahhhhhhh.

Now, doesn’t that feel better?

Practice that a few times, and then make it a part of your knitting repertoire so that you never have to worry about sloppy first stitches again…ever!

 

Don’t forget that even though the Tour de Fleece doesn’t start until July we are starting to warm up NOW! If you are a spinner,  consider joining us (it’s free!) and learn about how much FUN we have!!

Comments

  1. Great post! Thank you!! 🙂

    • Thanks! Hope you are well!! I have been meaning to write this for a while, it’s the most common problem that new knitters have and causes so much angst!! Hopefully this will help someone!

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